Searls – Magazine Project – Post 10

Reid Searls
Rationale
Project 4: Magazine Design
19 April 2011

Design Strategy:
In choosing an article for this project, I had to keep in mind the limitations of image sources. I knew I probably wouldn’t be able to take my own photographs or create all of my own graphics, so I had to think of an article that would lend itself to a design created using mostly found images. My next struggle, after finding an adequate article, was coming up with a cover story. The article I chose was not about a person, rather it was about objects – records and cassettes. This made it both easier and more difficult in various ways. It was easier in that I had many more options to choose from and wasn’t limited by finding the perfect portrait of a person. On the other hand, I had a myriad of cover choices and I needed to find one that was relatable and relevant. In the end, I chose a still from 2001: A Space Odyssey because I felt it represented the feel of my magazine – a sort of pop culture magazine that drew from the past, but still talked about current issues and themes. The magazine ended up with a retro feel to it (largely due to the article I chose) with a tinge of indie spirit per se.

Style Sheet:
Magazine title: Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 185 pt./222; no kerning
“10” (Headline): Avenir 95 Black, 54 pt./26; kerned
“Tips” (Headline): Avenir 95 Black, 40.5 pt./26; no kerning
“for” (Headline): Avenir 95 Black, 26.1 pt./26.1; no kerning
“Record” (Headline): Avenir 95 Black, 40.5 pt./35.1; no kerning
“Store Day” (Headline): Avenir 95 Black, 40.5 pt./49.5; no kerning
“Grammys” (Headline): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 55 pt./25; no kerning
“make” (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 31 pt./30; no kerning
“Drastic” “uts” (Cuts) (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 48 pt./30; no kerning
“C” (Cuts) (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 54 pt./30; no kerning
“to” (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 33 pt./0; no kerning
“C” (Categories) (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 56 pt./25; no kerning
“ategories” (Categories) (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 52 pt./25; no kerning
“The Return” (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 79 pt./40; no kerning
“of” (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 44 pt./74; no kerning
“Retro” (Headline):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 79 pt./13; no kerning
Issue # and date: Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 14 pt./16.8; no kerning

“They’re” (Article title):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 120.7 pt./73.1; no kerning
“makin’ a” (Article title):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 120.7 pt./79.1; no kerning
“comeback”  (Article title):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 120.7 pt./56.1; no kerning

“The” (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 79 pt./63; no kerning
“Return” (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 98 pt./29; no kerning
“of” (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 65 pt./29; no kerning
“V” (Vinyl) (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 97 pt./42; kerned
“inyl” (Vinyl) (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 88 pt./42; kerned
“&” (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 139 pt./42; kerned
“C” (Cassettes) (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 128 pt./58; kerned
“assettes” (Cassettes) (Deck head):  Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 79 pt./58; kerned
Byline: Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 22 pt./26.4; no kerning
First paragraph body copy: Avenir 55 Roman, 13.5 pt./16.2; no kerning
Jump spread body copy: Avenir 55 Roman, 10.65 pt./12.78; no kerning

Sidebar (right) title: Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 22.38 pt./12.78; no kerning
Sidebar (right) subtitles: Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 14 pt./16.8; no kerning
Sidebar (right) body copy: Adobe Garamond Pro Regular, 9 pt./10.8; no kerning

Pull quote: Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 19.1 pt./23; no kerning

“Top” and “inyls” (Vinyls) (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 42.3 pt./25.9; no kerning
“5” and “V” (Vinyls) (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 51.7 pt./25.9; no kerning
“inyls” (Vinyls) (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 42.3 pt/25.9; kerned
“of” (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 34.1 pt./32.9; kerned
“2010” (sidebar bottom, left): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 48.2 pt./32.9; kerned
Numbers (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 51.7 pt./25.9; no kerning
“2.8” (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 36.6 pt./32.6; kerned
“million” (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 33.1 pt./16.5; kerned
“V” (Vinyls) (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 40.2 pt./21.3; no kerning
“inyls” (Vinyls) (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 33.1 pt./21.3; kerned
“sold” (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 30.9 pt./22.4; no kerning
“in” (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 29.3 pt./22.4; no kerning
“2010” (sidebar bottom, right): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 33.7 pt./23; kerned
Band names and album titles (sidebar bottom): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 13.7 pt./16.4; no kerning

“Records” (folio): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 10 pt./12; no kerning
“•” (folio): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 13 pt./15.6; no kerning
Page number (folio): Adobe Garamond Pro Bold, 12 pt./14.4; no kerning

Choice of typefaces: I only use two typefaces in the entire magazine design because I wanted to keep a consistent feel. Adobe Garamond Pro had that retro, older feeling that goes along with the magazine image. Also, its relatively low contrast in stroke widths gives it some versatility when creating headlines and titles. For the body copy I used Avenir because it’s easy to read and gives the magazine that sense of modernity in what its saying, while still tying in the past/retro with the Adobe Garamond Titles and pull quote.

Margins:
Top: 2p6            Inside: 2p6
Bottom: 4p0        Outside: 2p5

Visuals:
Cover: The main image for the cover is a screenshot of 2001: A Space Odyssey. It was 1920 x 1080 pixels at 96 dpi. The image was cropped and resized to 8.5 x 11 inches at 150 dpi. This posed some difficulties, because it was a lower quality image. To get around this issue, lines were added on top of the image to make it look like a TV monitor rather than a photograph. An image of a cassette which was taken at 2848 x 4288 pixels at 240 dpi.this image was cropped and resized to fit in the screenshot. I used this combination of images because 2001 conjures images of both past and future – prehistoric and futuristic space travel. And, while this magazine may not be reaching back so far into the past or so far into the future, it draws from a more recent past and a much sooner future with its image and its voice.

Jump spread: The major graphic on the jump spread, an album by The Defnics, was found on the internet at http://www.realmagick.com/the-fragile-vinyl-version/. It was 39.9 x 40.9 inches at 72 dpi and was resized to 19.2 x 19.6 at 150 dpi. I felt this graphic was better suited for the left page of the opening spread than say a large cassette because it provided a nice balance for the right page, which has the title, deck, first paragraph of body, and smaller cassette images. It also keeps the readers’ eyes moving with its circular shape and edge that runs along the side of the title, deck, and first paragraph.

The three cassettes were found at http://www.hyperbate.com/dernier/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/cassette_audio.jpg (left), http://theeniqma.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/basf-cassette-tape.jpg (center), http://www.rajalakshmi.org/stucontrib.html (right). They were found at 7.4 x 4.7 inches at 72 dpi, 11.1 x 7.1 in at 72 dpi, and 35.7 x 23.4 in at 72 dpi respectively. I felt these cassettes helped tie in the cover with the opening spread, since the cover predominatly features a cassette and the opening spread predominatly featured a vinyl record. The article talks about both cassettes and vinyls so I felt that the opening spread needed to show both.

Opening spread: The Beatles’ Abbey Road album cover was found at http://stommel.tamu.edu/~baum/boots/MISC/BEATLES/MFSL/ABBEY_ROAD_MFSL_BOOT/Cover.jpg. It was 13.9 x 13.7 inches at 72 dpi and was resized to 3.34 x 3.30 inches approximately 300 dpi. I included the Beatles’ album cover because it is the best selling LP of all time and continued the image of the magazine as an image of the past. The album covers at the bottom are representative of the present and future of the industry as they are the top selling records of the past year. They were found at (left to right) http://kickinthepeanuts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/beach_house-teen_dream.jpg, http://www.newdust.com/images/innerspeaker.jpg, http://www.thecitrusreport.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/385_arcadefire_thesuburbs.jpg, http://www.thecitrusreport.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/The-National-High-Violet1.jpg, and http://www.joelambertmastering.com/halcyon.jpg respectively. They were 12.5 x 12. 5 inches at 72 dpi, 20.8 x 20.8 in at 72 dpi, 12.5 x 12.5 in at 72 dpi, 20.8 x 20.8 at 72 dpi, and  21 x 20.8 in at 72 dpi respectively. They were resized to approximately 1.13 x 1.13 inches.

The 3 vinyls in the sidebar were taken from one image at 17.2 x 7.9 in at 72 dpi found at http://www.celinedionforum.com/index.php?showtopic=3585&st=1140. The image was cut into three smaller images and then cropped and resized.

Extras: There is a consisten color scheme throughout the magazine. Starting with the title of the magazine, the muted orange (C=0 M=54 Y=74 K=0) is seen in various places including the opening spread title, a swatch behind the drop cap on the jump spread and the titles in the bottom sidebar. Next is the light blue (C=25 M=1 Y=8 K=0) that is seen in the headline, the deck, and the swatches behind the pull quote and the right sidebar. The third main color is a deep maroon (C=36 M=80 Y=61 K=28). This color is again seen in the headlines as well as being the predominant color in the opening spread and the color of the drop cap, the jump quote, the title of the right sidebar, and the swatch behind the bottom sidebar. These three main colors tie together the magazine and the design. They play off each other and sometimes they are reversed – maroon on orange or orange on maroon or maroon on blue. There is also a hint of yellow that is brought through design primarily through the graphics on the opening and jump spreads and the third headline on the cover. This accent color further enforces the feel of the magazine and unites the cover, the opening spread, and the jump spread.

One response to this post.

  1. Posted by chelseawagner on April 25, 2011 at 11:32 PM

    I really love this magazine design. It has a retro feel, which is very fitting with your cover story. I like the use of cassette tapes on your opening spread. Your incorporation of two sidebar articles is quite impressive and they work well with the design. I also like how your “S” looks blown up above the start of your article. Your topic is unique and the design is great. A job well done!

    Reply

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